Lincoln celebrated here, 150 years after his death

HUDSON–Observances of the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination and the end of the Civil War has begun in Columbia County, with commemorative events and preparations for others.

The Galvan Foundation has contributed $1,500 toward the cost of the events in Hudson and the Town of Stuyvesant, said Hudson Deputy Mayor Gene Shetsky at a planning and review meeting in Hudson April 17. Other major contributors include Hudson Common Council’s Arts, Entertainment, and Tourism Committee, and Columbia County Tourism. In addition, event planners are raising funds by selling t-shirts for $20 each.

By April 17, about $1,500 was still needed to cover the estimated Hudson and Stuyvesant total cost. Those wishing to contribute may write tax-deductible checks to CEDC/Lincoln Funeral Train and mail them to Columbia Economic Development Corporation, 4303 Route 9, Hudson, NY 12534. To buy t-shirts, contact Mr. Shetsky at 518 828-7217 or ten.r1563871255atsla1563871255v@roy1563871255amnos1563871255duh1563871255.

On Sunday April 19, a concert by the 77th New York Regimental Balladeers took place in Hudson’s Presbyterian Church. Women and men wearing Civil War era clothes sang and played music of that era.

The event opened with a welcome by Mr. Shetsky and remarks by Hudson Mayor William Hallenbeck, Jr., who thanked the participants and said the event would not have taken place without volunteers, donations and the Stuyvesant Rail Station Restoration Committee. Congressman Chris Gibson (R-19th) also attended.

Following the mayor’s remarks, balladeer John Quinn introduced the performance, explaining that the 77th New York Regimental Balladeers, based in Windham, is “dedicated to preserving the music of the Civil War.” For the Lincoln funeral commemoration the group had been preparing since October, and its travels throughout the state acquainted members with various approaches to the 150th anniversary. “I can say without reservation that the effort in Hudson and Stuyvesant was exceptional,” said Mr. Quinn, who recognized the special effort put out Richard Anderson and Ann Songayllo of the Stuyvesant Rail Station Restoration Committee, and Mr. Shetsky.

The concert included a Lincoln campaign song, recruitment and morale-building tunes, period dance tunes and retrospective memorials. Instruments included guitars, violins and other stringed instruments, and the church balcony’s organ. Several of the songs are still known today, and Mr. Quinn invited the audience to sing along, while Civil War era photographs, drawings and flags flashed on a wall. Between musical numbers, actors dressed as Ulysses S. Grant, Mark Twain and Abraham Lincoln gave renditions of their characters’ statements.

Meanwhile in Hudson flags have started flying early in several places where most years they appear first for Memorial Day.

For information on the Hudson and Stuyvesant events, contact: Richard Anderson, 518 758-6433; Ann Songayllo, 518 610-2300); Gene Shetsky, 518 828-7217 and moc.l1563871255iamg@15638712555102n1563871255iartn1563871255locni1563871255l1563871255.

 

Comments are closed.