Will we learn from the Kohl’s deal?

START WITH A SIMPLE PREMISE: Everybody would like a tax break. Rich, poor or somewhere in between, all of us feel the bite and would welcome a little relief.

In theory this country has a progressive tax system–the more a person or a company earns, the more the person or company pays in taxes, up to a point; and while some get rich, money should move up and down the economic ladder. But over the last few decades, people who already had a lot of money have accumulated an even bigger slice of the pie, so that 20% of the population now controls 85% of the nation’s wealth. Read more…

Paws for reflection

WALKING THE DOG recently in the Village of Chatham we encountered two boys speaking Spanish to each other. We exchanged greetings in English, but as they headed up the street in the other direction, they giggled loudly, and one of them exclaimed, “Zapatos!”

He had it right. The dog was wearing shoes. Well, technically booties. He wears them every winter, and it’s easy to predict the human reaction based on gender. Men tend to chuckle dismissively, as if to say: Your dog’s a wuss. Women coo and say: That’s so cute. Seldom does anyone remark on the practicality of his footware. Read more…

You call this a budget?

RAISE YOUR HANDS: Who thinks the state should cut spending and reduce the tax burden on ordinary New Yorkers? Okay, now how many of you want to pay higher property taxes? … Anybody?

That always seems the choice left to taxpayers in lean years, and this one certainly qualifies as lean. Governor David Paterson issued his executive budget last week, and while it doesn’t cut overall spending, it does keep the increase below 1%, with significant reductions. Read more…

What Tony Quirino did

IT TAKES ALL KINDS of ingredients to make a community, starting with people and their institutions. But after the basics like government and schools, the things that distinguish one place from another come from quirky, unexpected features–what you might call character. Put the Crandell Theatre on Main Street in Chatham under the heading of character.

Since 1926 the theater has been the central source of year-round public entertainment in the village. It started as a vaudeville stage but soon switched to movies. For the last quarter century it has been run by Anthony “Tony” Quirino and his wife, Sandy. Before that, it was owned by Mr. Quirino’s father. The younger Mr. Quirino died unexpectedly this week at 62. Read more…

Bad decisions cost town money

NO WAY. UH UNH. F’RGETABOUDIT. In slightly more elegant legal language, that’s what a judge told Alan Wilzig about his hopes to pave and ride on the mile-long motorcycle track he’s built at his property in the Town of Taghkanic. The judge said Mr. Wilzig can’t use the track now or ever, and the town better not tell him he can.

Mr. Wilzig, who bought 240 acres near the Taconic State Parkway in 2005 and crowed online at the time about turning it into “Wilzig Racing Manor,” is a very wealthy man. He and his lawyer now say he plans to appeal the ruling by state Supreme Court Judge Patrick J. McGrath, even though Judge McGrath is the second state judge in the last three years to tell him in no uncertain terms that town law does not allow him to build and use a racetrack. Read more…