Voters back school budgets

NEW LEBANON—It seemed that the discovery of a “tax collection error” and other financial problems had doomed the New Lebanon Central School District budget proposal before this week’s vote. The spending plan carried a 6% increase in the tax levy, more than three times the nominal limit set by the state. With that much of an increase it would take at least 60% of New Lebanon District voters to approve the budget in order for it to pass.

The district didn’t give their school district in the far northeast corner of the county 60% approval… 386 of them voted Yes with just 141 voting No. The $12.1million spending plan for the 2021-22 school year received 73% support.

In a message to the community on the school website New Lebanon Superintendent of Schools Andrew Kourt thanked local voters and wrote, “This outcome is a testament to every member of our district community. Tonight’s vote reaffirms the community’s long standing commitment to our students and district. On behalf of the district, I want to thank you for your support of the New Lebanon Central School District. The approved 2021-2022 school budget will allow the district to continue the excellent academic programs and extracurricular opportunities for our students.” Read more…

With leaps and bounds, ballet marks new town pavilion’s debut

Saturday, May 8 was the first event hosted at the newly constructed pavilion at Crellin Park on Route 66 in Chatham. The Punctilious Mr. P’s Place Card Co’s The Joy Economy, based in Old Chatham, presented Chevalier Ballet in a program of classical and contemporary ballet. The program also included performances by local children who took a free dance class earlier in the day with the company. The performance Saturday evening had limited capacity to ensure social distancing and the audience and performers wore masks. Mr. P’s co-founders Karen Suen-Cooper and Martin Cooper organized the event and thanked the Town Board and Town Recreation Director Michael West for use of the park. More information is at mrpsplacecards.com. The pavilion construction, funded by the Town of Chatham, was completed last fall. Photo by Emilia Teasdale

Voters back school budgets in 2021-22 year

NEW LEBANON—It seemed that the discovery of a “tax collection error” and other financial problems had doomed the New Lebanon Central School District budget proposal before this week’s vote. The spending plan carried a 6% increase in the tax levy, more than three times the nominal limit set by the state. With that much of an increase it would take at least 60% of New Lebanon District voters to approve the budget in order for it to pass.

The district didn’t give their school district in the far northeast corner of the county 60% approval… 386 of them voted Yes with just 141 voting No. The $12.1million spending plan for the 2021-22 school year received 73% support. Read more…

ICC voters hear from 5 running for 3 seats

KINDERHOOK—The Ichabod Crane High School Participatory Government Class hosted a virtual “Meet the Candidates Night” on Monday. Five candidates are running for three open seats on the board. None are incumbents, though one person running has served on the board before. All three open seats are for three-year terms.

Over 50 people attended the forum, held on Zoom May 10. High school seniors in the class created the questions and two students, Emma Brusie and Nicholas Gould, hosted the hour-long event.

Jennifer Allard, Resa Dimino, Regina Rose, Anne Schaefer and Jared Widjeskog will all be on the May 18 school budget and election ballot and all of them answered questions at the forum. There are candidate bios on the district website at www.ichabodcrane.org Read more…

Hudson art teacher retires after 39 years

HUDSON—“Art communicates our innermost thoughts. It tells stories. Art is as important as the core curriculum courses. It is the one way many kids are able to express their thoughts and feelings,” said Chuck Peters. He plans to retire in June from teaching art in the Hudson City School District for 39 years.

“I am blessed to have been able to work in one place so long,” he said in an interview earlier this year.

Mr. Peters said he wanted to be an art teacher since sixth grade when an art teacher “sparked my interest even more. From that point on, I knew that was what I wanted to do.” Read more…