Fate of Chatham’s silver screen remains in limbo

CHATHAM–The lights on the Crandell Theatre’s marquee will be dark a while longer. Keith Flint, the lawyer for the estate of theater owner Tony Quirino, who died suddenly in January, said the theater will not open again until it’s sold to a new owner.

Mr. Flint said that Mr. Quirino’s estate is in the process of being “administered.” He said there had been at least three parties interested in buying the historic theater on Main Street, but no offers can be made until the estate is settled. Read more…

Philmont will set off rockets in July

PHILMONT–Plans are “rolling right along” for this year’s Philmont Community Day, Trustee Doug Cropper told the Village Board Monday.

Villager Richard Howard has stepped up to the plate, Mr. Cropper said, and planning for the July 10 event is well under way. Read more…

Dump meets criteria top Superfund status

NASSAU–The federal government is stepping in and recognizing an environmental disaster that has impacted residents in this Rensselaer County village for decades and continues to threaten communities downstream along the Valatie Kill in Columbia County.

A 60-day public comment period began Thursday for residents to weigh in on the Dewey Loeffel toxic waste dump. Officials from the Environmental Protection Agency told a crowd of local residents Thursday that the EPA will add the site to the National Priorities List, which would make the closed dump and Nassau Lake, where chemicals from the dump have been found, a federal Superfund site. This would allow the EPA to put pressure on G.E., Schenectady Chemical and Bendix– the latter two firms now under different ownership– to fund further remediation. Read more…

Schools plan huge layoffs

State budget proposal would force districts to cut jobs

HUDSON–At this week’s school board meeting Superintendent John Howe gave up the annual 3% raise his contract calls for in a resolution that was proposed and approved by the board. Two board members expressed their sincere appreciation for Mr. Howe’s gesture, and people attending the meeting applauded. But the savings from the foregone raise, amounting to $4,050, are only a drop in the bucket in what is shaping up to be one of the toughest school budget seasons in years.

The situation looks similarly grim at Taconic Hills, where the district is hoping to save money by reducing the number of bus runs. But even that may not avert the prospects of up to 45 layoffs. Read more…