Book shows Chatham through long-ago lenses

CHATHAM–If you ever wondered what Main Street here looked like in the mid-1800s, open a copy of Images of America: Around the Village of Chatham, a collection of old photos of and around the village, with detailed captions that address village history. Village Historian Gail Blass Wolczanski, who collected the photos and wrote captions for the book, said that the hardest part of creating this book was stopping her research.

The book came about after the Historical Society got a call “out of the blue” from Arcadia Publishing, which wanted someone to write the book about Chatham, said Mrs. Wolczanski’s. And her first question was: “Which one?”

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Board sets January 12 date for schools improvement vote

CHATHAM – The school board voted last week to place a $5-million capital improvement project before voters in January. The project will be presented on the ballot as two propositions, letting voters decide on whether to permit the district to spend the money on upgrades and repairs in all three district buildings, with the second proposal asking for approval the replace the lights at the high school athletic field.

The projects would be paid for with federal economic stimulus money and from the district’s capital reserves. No new taxes would be required to pay for the work.

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Calculator figures duration of UI benefit

ALBANY—A new feature on the state Labor Department’s website is designed to make it easier for Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants to determine the length of time they can receive benefits, according to an announcement from state Labor Commissioner M. Patricia Smith.
Given the complex nature of the federal extension programs (multiple Tiers with differing timelines), the department has implemented an online tool to assist the unemployed in gathering information on the total possible number of weeks they may collect UI benefits, based on their initial claim filing date.
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Getting to the water’s edge

Waterfront plan for Hudson movers closer to completion

HUDSON–Like the tide, enthusiasm for the city’s proposed Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan has ebbed and flowed over the last two decades. But Hudson city officials now believe they have completion of the plan in sight and with it more money for the city and far greater public access to the river.

This Monday, December 7, the Common Council will receive a briefing on the current status of the plan as the city considers the latest and final draft of the Generic Environmental Impact Study for the changes proposed to the waterfront. The environmental study alone cost $43,000, all of it grant money, which may help explain why many municipalities proposing similar waterfront plans haven’t bothered with environmental impact study, Hudson Mayor Rick Scalera said in a recent interview. But the mayor sees the detailed impact document as a tool to promote the types of development the city wants to see along its waterfront, making the waterfront an “economic engine” for the community.

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New Lebanon loses its only market

Sour economy, tight credit, competition force owner to close 

NEW LEBANON–Signs posted on the front door announced news that few residents wanted to hear: The New Lebanon Supermarket is closing for good by the end of this week.

Customers described themselves as “shocked,” “devastated.” Georgette Tefo was so disheartened that she couldn’t shop, despite the 20% discount on the remaining stock; she said she needed to “time to process” the news.

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